What is the difference between NIV and NLT Bible versions?

The NIV is an original translation, meaning that more than 100 biblical scholars started from scratch and returned to the original Hebrew, Aramaic and Greek texts to create an entirely new translation, instead of referencing an existing translation. The NLT, on the other hand, is a revision of the Living Bible.

Is NLT or NIV easier to understand?

NIV: a fluid paraphrase of the Greek texts, making it readable — but just so. NLT: a fluid paraphrase of the English texts making it an easier read.

Is NLT translation accurate?

It is easier to read than the English Standard Version and New International Version. So was The Living Bible. But where that version sometimes sacrificed precision for readability, the NLT has been made more accurate, without making it too forbidding.

Is it bad to read the NLT Bible?

It is okay to read any Bible. Modern speech translations help to make understanding easier. This is very important because Proverbs 4:7 admonishes: Wisdom is the most important thing, so acquire wisdom, And with all you acquire, acquire understanding.

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What is wrong with the NIV?

The problem with the NIV is that is not a great translation. It uses paraphrase a lot. Yes, I’m aware that paraphrase is often necessary in order to communicate phrases in other languages. Sometimes a literal translation is lost on the readers.

What verses are missing from the NLT Bible?

The sixteen omitted verses

  • (1) Matthew 17:21.
  • (2) Matthew 18:11.
  • (3) Matthew 23:14.
  • (4) Mark 7:16.
  • (5 & 6) Mark 9:44 & 9:46.
  • (7) Mark 11:26.
  • (8) Mark 15:28.
  • (9) Luke 17:36.

Is NLT Bible easy read?

For many people, the New Living Translation (NLT) is the easiest version of the Bible to read because it uses normal modern English. It is an accurate thought-for-thought translation of the original languages of the Bible and is widely accepted.

Is the NLT Bible approved by the Catholic Church?

Tyndale is pleased to announce the NLT Catholic Holy Bible Readers Edition, approved by the Catholic Church for reading and study and including the official Imprimatur. … The Holy Bible, New Living Translation communicates God’s Word powerfully to all who read it.

Which is the easiest Bible to read?

The Holy Bible: Easy-to-Read Version (ERV) is an English translation of the Bible compiled by the World Bible Translation Center. It was originally published as the English Version for the Deaf (EVD) by BakerBooks.

Which is the best translation of the Bible?

Through 29 December 2012, the top five best selling translations (based on both dollar and unit sales) were as follows:

  • New International Version.
  • King James Version.
  • New Living Translation.
  • New King James Version.
  • English Standard Version.
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How popular is the NLT Bible?

According to the Christian Booksellers Association (as of March 2014), the NLT is the second most popular Bible translation based on unit sales, and the fourth most popular based on sales numbers. … It was later released in North America as the Catholic Holy Bible Reader’s Edition on October 17, 2017.

Which Bible translation should I use?

Almost all scholars agree that the New American Standard Bible (NASB) gets the crown for being the most accurate English Bible translation.

Is NLT a good study Bible?

It is a very good Study Bible. It has all the basics- a concordance, maps, definitions, summaries of the background and authorship of each book, biographies of main characters, verse synopsis, and references to other related verses in the Bible. It is laid out in a common sense way and the font is decent.

Why is NIV so popular?

NIV is very popular because it has a solid balance between “word for word” and “thought for thought”. The only “thought for thought” version that made it on this chart was NLT and CEV. This of course doesn’t mean that they are inferior.

Why is KJV better than NIV?

The NIV is accurate, readable, and clear, yet true to the original Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek of the Bible. The KJV was the Authorized Version being translated via the Antioch manuscript textline, and also the New Testament being translated from the Textus Receptus.