Your question: What did God say about the law?

Romans 13:1-2 says: “Obey the government, for God is the One who has put it there. There is no government anywhere that God has not placed in power. So those who refuse to obey the law of the land are refusing to obey God, and punishment will follow.”

What did Jesus say about the law?

In Matthew 5:17-18, Jesus says, “Do not think that I have come to abolish the law or the prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them.

What did Jesus say about abolishing the law?

Matthew 5:17 (“Do not think that I have come to abolish Law or the Prophets; I have not come to abolish them but to fulfill them.”).

What is the biblical purpose of the law?

Though times and customs changed, God’s law served as a bedrock of guiding ideals to help the people of God (both then and now) live in such a way as to love God and love neighbor.

Why did Jesus break the law?

Although Jesus did break laws it is vitally important to know which, or better whose laws He broke. Mr. Swartzentruber stated in his letter, “My Bible says that many times Jesus broke the law by healing on the Sabbath. … Jesus was clearly teaching obedience to the Roman laws and also to obey God’s laws.

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What is God’s moral law?

Third, are God’s moral laws. These relate to justice and judgment. They are based on God’s own holy nature. As such, these ordinates are holy, just and unchanging. Moral laws encompass regulations on justice, respect and sexual conduct.

What does the Bible say about the law of Moses?

The law of Moses was a “preparatory gospel” that included the principles of repentance, baptism, remission of sins, and the law of carnal commandments.

Who was the law given to in the Bible?

The law attributed to Moses, specifically the laws set out in the books of Leviticus and Deuteronomy, as a consequence came to be considered supreme over all other sources of authority (any king and/or his officials), and the Levites were the guardians and interpreters of the law.