Your question: How did the Roman Catholic Church responded to the spread of Protestantism in the sixteenth century?

Explanation: The first effort to stop the spread of protestantism was to declare the effort to reform the Catholic Church a heresy. People who supported the protests of the sale of indulgences and other practice perceived by the protesters as unbiblical were excommunicated.

How did the Roman Catholic Church respond to Protestantism?

The Roman Catholic Church responded with a Counter-Reformation initiated by the Council of Trent and spearheaded by the new order of the Society of Jesus (Jesuits), specifically organized to counter the Protestant movement.

What changes did the Catholic Church make in response to the Protestant Reformation?

The Catholic Church of the Counter-Reformation era grew more spiritual, more literate and more educated. New religious orders, notably the Jesuits, combined rigorous spirituality with a globally minded intellectualism, while mystics such as Teresa of Avila injected new passion into the older orders.

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What did the Catholic Church do to followers of Protestantism in the 16th century?

The Catholic response to the Protestant Reformation is known as the Counter-Reformation which resulted in a reassertion of traditional doctrines and the emergence of new religious orders aimed at both moral reform and new missionary activity.

How did the Roman Catholic Church respond to the new religious situation of the sixteenth century?

How did the Catholic church respond to the new religious situation? The papacy began leading a movement for reform within the church and countering Protestant ideas. … New religious orders such as the Jesuits and Ursulines spread Catholic ideas through teaching and missionary work.

How did the spread of Protestantism threaten the Catholic Church?

Explanation: The first effort to stop the spread of protestantism was to declare the effort to reform the Catholic Church a heresy. … In 1408 The Catholic Church declared the Lollards heretics and encouraged their persecutions, loss of wealth and even death. By 1438 the Lollard movement was dead.

How did the Catholic Church try to stop the spread of Protestantism?

The catholic church tried to stop the spread of Protestantism by excommunicating, military repression and counter reformation. Explanation: Protestant Reformation began in Europe during the 16th century to challenge the religious and political practices of the Roman Catholic church.

How did Catholicism spread?

Nevertheless, Roman Catholicism expanded throughout the world during the Age of Exploration. Explorers and settlers brought Catholic beliefs to the New World. Spanish, Portuguese and French missionaries set up churches and colonized areas in North and South America.

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How did the church respond to heresy?

During its early centuries, the Christian church dealt with many heresies. … In the 12th and 13th centuries, however, the Inquisition was established by the church to combat heresy; heretics who refused to recant after being tried by the church were handed over to the civil authorities for punishment, usually execution.

How did the Catholic Church respond to the ninety five theses?

How did the Catholic Church respond to the Ninety-Five Theses? It condemned the list and asked the writer to recant it. … were excommunicated from the Catholic Church for their actions.

How did the Catholic Church gain power?

The Catholic Church became very rich and powerful during the Middle Ages. People gave the church 1/10th of their earnings in tithes. … Because the church was considered independent, they did not have to pay the king any tax for their land. Leaders of the church became rich and powerful.

How did the Catholic Church reform itself?

The Counter-Reformation served to solidify doctrine that many Protestants were opposed to, such as the authority of the pope and the veneration of saints, and eliminated many of the abuses and problems that had initially inspired the Reformation, such as the sale of indulgences for the remission of sin.